Comparison of Kendo UI and Wijmo, Part 2

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In today’s post we’ll briefly cover the available themes for Kendo UI and Wijmo. Then we will convert the menus in our project to use the javascript library.

Themes

The Kendo UI comes with 5 pre-built themes and a theme builder.

Wijmo comes with 6 “premium” themes and the two dozen or so jQuery themes for a total of 30 themes. You can use the jQuey theme roller to build your own custom Wijmo themes.

The Kendo theme builder shows more controls, but the jQuery theme roller gives you more options to modify. Which, depending on your viewpoint, be a plus or a minus.

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Comparison of Kendo UI and Wijmo, Part 1

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This is the first in a series of posts on comparing Kendo UI and Component One’s Wijmo. One of my current projects calls for using enhanced jQuery based UI controls. My plan is to start simple. Take the basic MVC3 solution template and build a small web application.

The entire application will be focused on the user interface, so the backend pieces will be quick and dirty.

This first post will deal with setting up the solution and converting the menu in the default layout to be either Kendo or Wijmo based.

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Asp.Net Mvc Reporting Solutions

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I am currently working on a MVC project that requires a very simple reporting solution. The requirements are as follows:

  1. Present each report to the user as a PDF
  2. It must use the existing complex business objects found in the solution
  3. No ad hoc reporting required and no online report viewer required
  4. Has to use existing database connection strings, I don’t want to deal with duplicate connection strings that have to be updated whenever the solution gets deployed

Below are my thoughts on the various solutions I tried before finally choosing Telerik Reporting.

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Book Review: 20 Recipes for Programming MVC 3

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I was excited about the opportunity to read and review the book “20 Recipes for Programming MVC 3″. I was hoping for some great programming gems that combined my love of Mvc programming with patterns. This book fell far short of my expectations. The first chapter discusses the use of the Authorize attribute and the out of the box FormsAuthentication security that comes with the default Mvc projects. Somewhat disappointed I pressed on, thinking this may be a good book for someone new to Mvc programming.

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Tulsa School of Dev, 2011

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Last Friday I gave a presentation on setting up an Asp.Net Mvc application at the Tulsa School of Dev. The remainder of this post provides numerous links to information on routing, dependency injection, areas, html helpers, T4 templates, data annotation, and a couple of nuget packages you may find interesting.

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Facebook Posts From Your Mvc App

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In this post you will find a complete example of posting to a Facebook wall from an Asp.Net Mvc application. In addition to posting to a Facebook wall this post will show you how to display pages from your web site inside Facebook. We will be using the Facebook C# sdk found on Codeplex.

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HP Computer Saga

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I have been building computers for more than 20 years. I am also getting to the point where building computers doesn’t have the same thrill that it once did. I just want the darn thing to work. The computer has to have the features I want, which is why I still generally build my own. On December 31, 2009 I decided to buy a pre-built HP computer because it had all the features I wanted. It was a quad core AMD with 8 gigabytes for memory. I was in computer heaven. It was fast and all I had to do when I got it home was connect a couple of monitors and the network. Viola! Instant PC!

Now fast forward to January this year and the computer begins a series of BSOD. I haven’t installed any new software in a month or so. I pop the cover off and find a wire has fallen into the fan on the video card heat sink. I untangle the wire from the fan blade and try to spin the fan with my finger. The motor is burnt out and it stinks of burnt varnish. I pull the very hot video card from the motherboard. It’s not looking good. I plug my monitor into the on-board video card port. Now the computer gets to a certain point in the boot process and blue screens. I decide to use the restore discs to do a complete restore. I have all my important files backed up on Carbonite, source code in a subversion repository on a different server. After a couple of attempts at restoring the original image the computer will no longer power on. When I pulled the hot video card out of the motherboard I was hoping only the video card was bad. By now, I am certain the motherboard is toast too. More

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Building a MVC2 Template, Part 19, Finishing NHibernate

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This post will be fairly short. It will also tie together the two previous posts into our solution. If I haven’t left anything out, by the end of this article your solution will compile without errors and all the specifications will pass testing. We’ll start by creating the tables to hold our data. In part 18 we created the mapping from the tables we are going to create  to our POCOs. Then we’ll need to tell Ninject which provider repository to inject whenever one is requested.

So lets get started!

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Building a MVC2 Template, Part 18, Adding NHibernate

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Here is the long awaited post that deals directly with adding NHibernate to our MVC2 template project. This post will present the code that gives our providers (Membership, Role, and Profile) access to the database. This implementation of the IProviderRepository interface will use NHibernate.
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Building a MVC2 Template, Part 17, Adding Provider Repository Specifications

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In the next three series of posts we will be adding NHibernate, Fluent NHibernate, and NHibernate.Linq to our template. This specific installment on building a MVC2 template we will update the Nehemiah.Specs project. This project contains all of the specifications for the template. We’ll add the specifications for the provider repository. The provider repository is the data layer that supports our membership, role, and profile providers. The specifications are not unique to any data layer implementation. As such you could easily switch out the NHibernate provider repository to a LinqToSQL repository (which I have already done) without changing the specifications.

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